Regenerative Medicine – the Exciting and Rapidly Evolving New Medical Field – Podcast Interview

Below you will find an easy to read a full transcript of Dr. Warren Bleiweiss’ new podcast interview on February 12, 2019. You can listen to the podcast or simply read the easy to follow transcript below. Enjoy!

Click to listen or read the transcript below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Podcast Interview:

 RC: Hello, everyone. This is Liz Harvey, coming to you from our studios in New York City, where we are dedicated to bringing you top quality advice from many of the leading expert professionals across the U.S.

In today’s episode, we are speaking with Dr. Warren Bleiweiss about the exciting field of regenerative medicine. He is a graduate of New York University School of Medicine and is board certified in both anesthesiology and pain management. His long list of accomplishments includes leadership experience as a hospital anesthesiology department director, the inventor of a patented medical device, and the founder of one of the first multi-disciplinary pain management centers in New Jersey. Dr. Bleiweiss also pioneered the treatment of oxygen ozone disc injection therapy in the United States, which is a powerful regenerative treatment.

He has been successfully treating patients for over 30 years. Dr. Bleiweiss specializes in minimally invasive alternative treatments that heal patients without surgery or potentially harmful medication. His treatment protocols are specifically designed to activate the body’s innate ability to recover and regenerate. His practice has been producing excellent results by utilizing these alternative methods.

We previously discussed oxygen ozone treatments with Dr. Bleiweiss. Today we are focusing on other aspects of regenerative medicine, and we are discussing the exciting, rapidly evolving medical field of regenerative medicine.

Hi, Dr. Bleiweiss. How are you today?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: I’m good, how are you?

RC: I’m doing great. Thanks so much for joining me.

I know you stay informed about the rapidly developing science of regenerative medicine. Could you please give us an overview of some of these exciting scientific breakthroughs?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: Yes, I’d be happy to, I’m always happy to discuss this amazing field of medicine. I’d like to first point out some of the differences between regenerative medicine, and traditional, what we call modern medicine. So, modern medicine manages diseases and attempts to heal diseases by various modalities such as, giving antibiotics for bacterial infection, providing medications for conditions such as high blood pressure or diabetes. Or, in the case of severe joint problems such as severe osteoarthritis, we have the joint replacement procedures that surgeons perform.

The goal of regenerative medicine is to restore structure and function of damaged tissues and organs in the body. The body has the innate ability to heal itself, and regenerative medicine harnesses this capacity of the body and uses it to actually help heal conditions.

I’ll give you an example. I mean, these are things that I’ve just thought about in the past. Have you ever thought back to when you were really young? I actually don’t know how young you are, but let’s talk about when we were teenagers, or in our early 20s. You twist your knee, let’s say, playing basketball or football, or whatever sport you do. Or you fall off your bicycle and slam onto the ground. Or you twist your knee and fall off your bicycle the same day and slam onto the ground. You know, it hurts, and you’re sore. Very rapidly, whether it’s today or two days, you feel better and it becomes a non-event. Most likely the next week or two weeks later, you don’t even remember. You’re out playing football or basketball, or riding your bike and you’re not even thinking about the fact that you hurt yourself a couple of weeks ago.

As we get older and we age, that doesn’t happen quite the same way. So, injuries start taking longer and longer to heal. In our later years, we start accumulating, I call it accumulating injuries. Certain injuries just might take years to heal, or they don’t heal at all. That’s because of the body. Like I said, the body has the innate ability to heal. We have a vast reserve, a reservoir of STEM cells, and there are other healing qualities a body has.

Let’s talk about STEM cells. Those cells are activated, and if we have an injury and they migrate to the injured tissue and they nurse the injured tissue back, sometimes they might even replace the injured tissue. As we get older, it doesn’t really break down, but it becomes less active. At some point, we start losing the battle between normal cell death which occurs every day. Every day we lose like somewhere around 300 million cells in our body to death. It’s just a normal thing. We always keep pace with it, but as we get older and older and it’s different for each individual. Let’s just say in the late 40s, we start losing the balance between replacing those cells and losing the cells, the balance shifts over where we lose more than we replace.

Regenerative medicine is a medical field that activates the dormant STEM cells in our body with various treatments such as injecting new STEM cells, or harvesting STEM cells from our body and re-injecting it into an injured area or using biologics act to reactivate these STEM cells. It reactivates the normal healing systems in the body. So, regenerative medicine is called regenerative because it helps regenerate. Now, it’s not going to make us all 20 years old again but it does help heal structures that are injured over time.

How are you able to stay on top of such a rapidly developing medical field?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: It takes a lot of work, and a lot of time, but it’s something that I’m just so fascinated by and I love. So, I’m very happy to spend the energy to stay on top of this. As in any field, whether it’s a medical field or you’re an engineer, or you work in electronics or whatever it is, we have to keep up with the published literature. There’s a vast amount of literature that’s published. When I say literature, I’m talking about research publications on new developments. I regularly keep up with the literature.

I also regularly go to conferences with experts in the field. In fact, I just came back from one very interesting conference. Not only do we at these conferences get to present the new findings and go over old techniques, but it creates an environment where professionals get together and discuss various treatments, and how to improve them, et cetera. I also talk on a fairly regular basis with the experts in the field, because most know each other and have each other’s contacts. If there’s any new developments or if I think of something really exciting, I could call one of the researchers and discuss it with them.

I’m also a member of the Academy of STEM Cell Physicians. We have weekly conferences. It’s done over the internet where we all get together and discuss issues. So, I’m very on top of the field.

What are some of the clinical applications of this new medical field?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: The clinical applications are almost unlimited. I want to again stress that these treatments are regenerative and they restore structure and function. It’s a cellular rejuvenation and replenishment phenomenon as opposed to just managing something for example, with medications.

It helps the body heal. For example, if we have a joint problem like osteoarthritis of the knee or the shoulder, or the hip. The regenerative medicine treatments could help restore the structure and function of the joint. It could help skin to rejuvenate. It could help hair follicles to reproduce more hair and thicker hair. If the follicles are dead, like if someone is totally, totally bald like, very shiny skin with no follicles, it’s not going to just regrow a head of hair. If you have thinning hair with follicles left, the treatments will induce those follicles to produce larger amounts of hair, and thicker hair. There’s a lot of promise that it helps to improve brain function. For example, in various forms of dementia and early Alzheimer’s.

So, those are just a few applications, but there’s a vast amount of applications.

How would a typical patient benefit from these treatments?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: So, a typical patient would feel less joint pain, feel younger, look younger, have increased vitality, and have improved brain function, if brain function is diminished. It’s not going to turn all of us into little Albert Einstein’s, but if it’s diminished it could help. So, it’s a very good thing.

I’ll give you another example, comparing, I don’t know why I think back to when I was younger, when I think of this regenerative medical stuff. The other day I was stuck in traffic and it took me about an hour and a half to get home. I get out of the car, and my back’s a little stiff, and my joints are a little stiff, and it takes me walking a little bit to get back to feeling good again. I was thinking that when I was younger, I went to college in Boston and I lived in New York, on Long Island. One day a friend of mine called me up and said, “Hey, let’s drive up to Boston today and visit our friends. We haven’t seen them, it’s the summer time. We’re not going to see them for a couple of months.” So, we got in his father’s Chevy Impala and we drove to Boston, and we had dinner, and we drove back to Long Island in one day. I don’t remember feeling stiff when I got out of the car. I mean, I don’t remember any of that.

So, these are aspects of aging that could really be helped with these regenerative medicine treatments.

RC: Okay. Well, thank you Dr. Bleiweiss. We know you’re busy, so I just want to thank you for your time and your help today.

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: Thank you very much.

RC: For our listeners across the country, if you are interested in speaking with the doctor, please visit www.alternativedisctherapy.com or call 973-403-3334 to schedule an appointment.

On behalf of our team, we want to thank you for listening, and we look forward to bringing you more top-quality content from our country’s leading experts.

 

ITunes Channel:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/alternative-methods-to-pain-management-through-oxygen/id1367256045

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss’ New Podcast Interview by RazorCast: Simple and Effective Relief for spinal disc pain conditions

Below you will find an easy to read transcript of Dr. Warren Bleiweiss’ podcast interview. You can listen to the podcast or simply read the easy to follow transcript below. Enjoy!

Click to listen or read the transcript below.

Podcast Interview Transcript:

RC: Hello, everyone. This is Liz Harvey, coming to you from our studios in New York City, where we are dedicated to bringing you top quality advice from many of the leading expert professionals across the U.S.

In today’s episode, we are speaking with Dr. Warren J. Bleiweiss, a leader in the United States in the emerging medical field of oxygen ozone injection therapy, for the treatment of herniated discs, joint and muscle pain, and injuries. Dr. Bleiweiss pioneered oxygen ozone disc injection therapy in the U.S. He is a graduate of New York University School of Medicine and is board certified in both Anesthesiology and Pain Management. His long list of accomplishments includes leadership experience as a hospital anesthesiology department director, the inventor of a patented medical device, and the founder of one of the first multi-disciplinary pain management centers in New Jersey. He has been successfully treating patients for over 30 years.

Dr. Bleiweiss specializes in minimally invasive alternative treatments that heal patients without surgery or potentially harmful medications. His treatment protocols are specifically designed to activate the body’s innate ability to recover and regenerate. His practice has been producing excellent results by utilizing these alternative methods.

We have previously discussed how there are many ways that ozone injection therapy is unlike other alternative treatment modalities. Today we are discussing how ozone injection therapy is the only alternative treatment that does not entail regularly repeated treatments. Due to ozone injection therapy’s unique effectiveness, the majority of patients do not require repeated treatments.

Hi, Dr. Bleiweiss. How are you today?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: I’m great, thank you.

RC: Thanks again for joining me.

How does oxygen-ozone injection therapy actually work to relieve pain in a spinal disc or joint?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: We’ve discussed this question in depth in the past, but I would like to go over some of the important aspects of oxygen-ozone injection therapy. The bottom line is it improves the environment for the existing cells in whatever structure you’re injecting. It does that on multiple levels. For example, it increases blood flow and oxygen delivery to tissues. It decreases inflammation. It increases the ability of cells to cope with oxidative stress. Now, I don’t want to go into this too deeply because I’ve covered this in the past, so I encourage anybody that’s interested to listen to previous interviews. But that’s an extremely, extremely important aspect, and it helps prevent further injuries by increasing the body’s ability to cope with oxidative stress.

It also kills almost all pathogens. There’s a theory that low grade infections can contribute to disc and joint degenerations in certain circumstances. An extreme example of this is Lyme disease. We all know that Lyme disease can destroy joints over time, and ozone kills pathogens, and it kills the Lyme organism also.

Also, in addition to that, for discs, it shrinks the disc just enough to get the pressure off of the nerve. Patients have asked me does it shrink it a lot? Does it cause other problems? No, it doesn’t. It shrinks it just enough to get the pressure off the nerve. Unlike surgery, where you’re taking a piece of the disc out and the disc height is reduced significantly, ozone does not reduce the disc height.

It also stimulates the proliferation of fibroblasts, which are the cells that make up fibrous tissue, and proliferation is the fancy word for, it means increasing the number rather than increasing the size or the strength. So that’s important, for example, muscles or certain ligaments or tissues that are injured, and also the annulus of the intervertebral disc, which is the spinal disc, which is always disrupted when there’s a herniation.

So unlike surgery, it doesn’t change the anatomy. It can be repeated with additive beneficial effects. There are no adverse effects, not like surgery or steroid, where if you repeat it, there are potential adverse effects. It has no adverse effects by repeating it. And it helps prevent future injury by helping the body cope with oxidative stress.

What are some painful conditions that oxygen-ozone injection therapy helps to alleviate?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: It helps alleviate pain from disc herniations of the neck and thoracic region, which is the mid-back and the low back. It helps any type of joint painful condition, whether it’s the shoulders, wrists, elbows, hips, knees, or ankles, and also painful muscle conditions.

For a new patient, what can they expect during their first treatment session?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: A disc injection procedure is an outpatient procedure. It’s performed at a surgery center. It’s a same-day procedure. Strict sterile conditions are used. I use fluoroscopic guidance to ensure that I’m in the right spot. Sedation is usually given, a mild sedation, but there are patients who don’t want sedation, so I just do it under local, and I’ve been told by these patients that it’s not particularly uncomfortable.

After a brief recovery period, the patient goes home. They can go to work the next day and resume most of their activities except exercise. One week after the procedure, they could do light exercises, and after two weeks, most patients could go back to all their normal exercises.

For muscle and joint injections, it’s a simple office procedure. There’s no sedation, there’s no x-ray, there’s no steroids. Patients can drive home afterwards. They can go to work afterwards. They can resume their normal activities afterwards. The only thing is I don’t recommend exercising until two days after the procedure.

Many treatment modalities require patients to come for repeated treatments on a schedule. I understand from our previous conversations that ozone injection therapy often generates remarkable results in one treatment, even in patients who suffered severe long-term pain conditions. Can you explain how ozone injection therapy is able to achieve this type of result, which your patients often call a miracle treatment?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: Yes, I’d love to. In addition to treating the cause of the symptom, which is the goal of all treatments, it also reverses the pathology. It promotes healing. It restores the normal state of the tissue. It helps the cells maintain homeostasis, which is very, very important for all living organisms to have homeostasis with their environment. And it helps prevent further injury by helping the body to cope with oxidative stress, which I have extensively discussed in other interviews. It’s a very, very important topic, so if anyone’s interested in it, I’d encourage them to listen to those other interviews, which are on my website.

RC: Thank you so much, Dr. Bleiweiss. We know you’re busy, so I just want to thank you for your time and your help today.

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: You’re welcome.

RC: For our listeners across the country, if you are interested in speaking with the doctor, please visit www.alternativedisctherapy.com, or call 973-403-3334 to schedule an appointment.

On behalf of our team, we want to thank you for listening, and we look forward to bringing you more top-quality content from our country’s leading experts.

ITunes Channel:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/alternative-methods-to-pain-management-through-oxygen/id1367256045

Pain Relief After Just One Oxygen Ozone Injection Treatment

Pain Relief After Just One Oxygen Ozone Injection Treatment

There have been numerous examples of how a single treatment with oxygen ozone injection therapy dramatically reduced my patients’ pain and significantly improved their quality of life, even those who were suffering from debilitating pain.  My patients often use the word “miracle” to describe their recovery.  It’s no surprise that medical oxygen ozone can accomplish this.  Oxygen-ozone promotes healing and helps to reverse the pathology.

Spine surgery can remove a herniated portion of a disc, but then the disc is permanently disrupted. Medications reduce the stimuli from painful pathology, but the medication is not curing the problem. It is just reducing the stimuli. And though certain deep tissue massage can help improve muscle pathology, various superficial massage techniques may make you feel better, but they’re just reducing the painful stimuli.

Ozone also helps restore the normal state of the tissue in our body and helps to restore homeostasis. Without homeostasis, an organism cannot survive. An organism has to be able to have a level of homeostasis. For example, if we weren’t able to control the sodium concentration in our blood, we would rapidly die. Oxygen-ozone helps the cells restore homeostasis when the scales are tipped in a certain direction that is not beneficial to the cells. Oxygen-ozone also helps prevent future injury, by helping the body cope with oxidative stress. That’s an extremely important point, which I’ve discussed extensively in other interviews, which I encourage people to listen to. It is a very fascinating topic. The ability to cope with oxidative stress is a very, very beneficial effect of ozone.

Determining if Oxygen Ozone Injection Therapy is Right for You

Determining if Oxygen Ozone Injection Therapy is Right for You

In order to determine if a patient will benefit from oxygen ozone injection therapy, I look at a number of factors. The history is extremely important. That is one of the most important aspects of determining if a patient will benefit. It is important to ask specific questions about the patient’s pain, and when it started, as well as other pertinent questions. During the history, I also observe the patient. I observe how they walk, sit and how they move which are also very important.

Doing a guided physical exam is extremely valuable with palpation techniques. For example, I look for involuntary muscle spasms when I am doing certain maneuvers. It is an additional indication of problems, rather than just relying on the patient saying, “Oh that’s painful,” or not. Sometimes the patient is not aware of these minute pain triggers.

Then, of course, I look at the diagnostic testing reports. I don’t look at the diagnostic tests first. I only look at the diagnostic testing reports after I do my history and physical examination, and formulate an opinion on what is most likely causing the patient’s pain. Then, I look at the diagnostic test report(s), because in a significant number of cases, the issue that is noted on the testing is not necessarily the cause of the patient’s pain.

I have talked about this before in previous podcasts or blogs, but I’ll just briefly mention it again. Studies have been done to demonstrate this, that if you take 1,000 people who are asymptomatic, they have no back pain or pain in general.  They are doing well and they are functioning great; you do an MRIs on each of them, you are going to find herniated discs on 200 or more of those patients. Those herniated discs are not causing pain at all. You can’t just jump to the conclusion that their pain is always caused by herniated discs.

I determine what pathology is causing their symptoms and I treat that pathology appropriately.  This approach enables me to remove the cause of the pain.   I have patient coming with their multiple tests and multiple doctors’ conclusion that they need back surgery but I determined it’s not a disk issue causing the pain but the hip issue. I remove the hip cause, the pain is also removed.

Pain Relief & Healing is Our Goal for YOU!

Click to listen or read the transcript below.

Podcast Interview Transcript:

RC: Hello, everyone. This is Liz Harvey, coming to you from our studios in New York City, where we are dedicated to bringing you top quality advice from many of the leading expert professionals across the U.S.

In today’s episode, we are speaking with Dr. Warren J. Bleiweiss, a leader in the United States in the emerging medical field of oxygen ozone injection therapy, for the treatment of herniated discs, joint and muscle pain, and injuries. Dr. Bleiweiss pioneered oxygen ozone disc injection therapy in the U.S. He is a graduate of New York University School of Medicine and is board certified in both Anesthesiology and Pain Management. His long list of accomplishments includes leadership experience as a hospital anesthesiology department director, the inventor of a patented medical device, and the founder of one of the first multi-disciplinary pain management centers in New Jersey. He has been successfully treating patients for over 30 years.

Dr. Bleiweiss specializes in minimally invasive alternative treatments that heal patients without surgery or potentially harmful medications. His treatment protocols are specifically designed to activate the body’s innate ability to recover and to regenerate. His practice has been producing excellent results by utilizing these alternative methods.

Today we are sharing some examples of patients who came to see Dr. Bleiweiss specifically for ozone injection therapy, but received different treatments with great results. Dr. Bleiweiss always does a thorough examination and review of a patient’s history and will sometimes recommend an alternative treatment based on the patient’s condition. His goal is to provide pain relief for a patient based on his or her specific needs.

Hello, Dr. Bleiweiss. How are you today?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: I’m great. Thank you.

RC: Thanks again for joining me.

When you see a new patient for the first time, what is involved in the initial examination and review of their history?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: All right, it’s very important to listen to the patient and observe the patient and ask specific guided questions. Now, when I say observe, I’m not talking about the physical examination portion of the interview, I’m talking about while I’m taking the history. So, for example, even when the patient walks in the room, I’m observing the way their gait is, the way they sit, if they’re favoring one limb, for example, so that’s very important.

During the history, it’s important to ask specific guided questions. For example, if someone has low back pain that goes down the leg obviously every physician is going to ask about numbness and weakness and other questions but I find it very important to ask very specific questions about the pain like, for example, how far does it go down the leg? Does it go below the knee? If it goes below the knee, what percentage of time does it go below the knee? Does it often go below the knee? Does it rarely go below the knee? Is there any component of groin pain? There are specific questions that will key me into the cause of their pathology.

After that, I perform a guided physical examination based on their condition. Like, for example, if their condition is in their back and going down their leg, I’m not going to spend a huge amount of time examining the shoulders or the eyes or the ears or other things. That would be a waste of time. I want to focus my energies on the problem at hand. Then after that, I look at the tests. I do not look at the tests, the results and the films before I do my history and physical examination because I don’t want to have any predetermined ideas of what’s causing their problem.

The reason why I do this is we know that there are a lot of things that show up on MRIs and X-rays that aren’t causing a patient’s problem. For example, if you take a thousand patients, I’m not going to use the exact numbers, but there have been multiple studies that have been performed related to this issue, so if you take a thousand patients who have zero pain, they have no back pain, they have no leg pain, if you ask them if they have pain, they say no, they’re healthy, they do everything they want, they’re young, and you do MRIs on those thousand people, you’re going to find disc herniations on approximately 200 of them, and they didn’t even know they had that.

What if one of those patients gets back pain and they had a disc herniation for five years and didn’t even know, and then you do an MRI and you see the disc herniation? Is that disc herniation really causing their back pain or is it something else? This is what I figure out while I’m doing the history and physical examination.

We also know that a lot of herniated disc aren’t painful from discography studies, which I don’t want to go into too detail on discography, but it’s basically pressurizing the disc with contrast and determining whether it’s causing a patient’s pain, so we know that many of the herniated discs in patients with back pain aren’t the source of the pain.

Then, once I do my history, my physical exam and look at all the studies, I analyze in my mind in a logical and succinct manner what is a likely cause of their pain. Sometimes it’s very obvious, It’s really obvious. Sometimes it’s not obvious, in which case, I might come up with what we call differential diagnosis and assign a probability to what may be causing the pain. I might be, for example, 80% sure that the disc is causing them pain, but I might think that there’s a probability that it’s a facet, which is a joint of the spine issue, and if that’s the case, then I’ll investigate the facet, which is very easy to determine if it’s causing the pain. You can just block the nerve to the facet until I’m 100% sure or 99% sure that the disc is the cause of the pain and then treat that.

Besides oxygen ozone injection therapy, what other alternative treatment modality do you practice?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: I also practice regenerative medicine such as stem cells. Everybody’s heard of stem cells. There are placental growth factors. There are things called exosomes, which are small vacuoles that carry pieces of messenger RNA, for example.

I also practice something called A2M, which is alpha-2-macroglobulin. Alpha-2-macroglobulin is a large protein that’s made in the liver, and it’s our body’s natural defense against proteases, which are enzymes that can destroy cartilage or discs. When those proteases, which are found in the body, are out of balance in a joint or a disc, they could actually cause destruction of that joint or disc over time. A2M completely stops the destructive activity of those proteases.

What’s great about A2M is that there’s a test that you could perform. It’s called the FAC test, and it’s sent out to an independent laboratory, and what I do is lavage the joint or the disc with saline and send it out. If that’s positive, there’s a very, very high chance that the A2M will solve the problem. The real importance of A2M in my mind, is that it prepares the structure, whether it’s a disc or a joint, for other regenerative treatments and makes it more likely for them to work.

Now, A2M has regenerative properties on its own. It does have binding sites for molecules that result in regeneration, but one thing that a lot of people don’t think of is that the process that has led to the degeneration, whether it’s a disc or a joint, may still be active at the time of a regenerative procedure.

Let’s say you have degenerative disc or someone has degenerative disc or a degenerative joint and they’re going to have a stem cell treatment. If they have an out of control, destructive protease problem in the joint or the disc that led to the destruction in the first place and it’s still present, then injecting the cells into that disc or joint is not going to be good at that time because they’re going to have less of a chance of surviving and thriving. So, it’s very important to put out the fire before you do the treatment.

If a patient came to you specifically for ozone injection therapy, what are some reasons why you would determine not to perform it?

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: Okay, so there are two main reasons. The first is if I don’t think that there’s a significant chance that it will help. That’s the first thing.

Now, I did mention in a previous interview that I had patients early on in treatment that came to me, if someone wants to read the story of Dr. Mike M., where they had severe degeneration, and I didn’t think the procedure was likely to work, and it did. I’m not talking about a patient like that. After that experience and after other positive experiences, I don’t see a downside to inject a joint that’s very degenerative because there’s a chance that it could work and work for a long time and have really dramatic results.

I’m talking about, for example, a patient who comes to me for ozone injection of a disc and I examined the disc, and the MRI, for example, shows severe degeneration and there’s spinal stenosis and other things that have developed over the years. If spinal stenosis has a significant bony encroachment problem, I know for a fact that ozone is not going to solve that issue because, once the bone grows around and narrows the canal, the ozone is not going to take the bone away. That’s a good example of why I would not do the ozone. I may recommend something else, but I’m not going to do the ozone for that.

Now, the other reason is that if I discover that there’s pain coming from another issue, another source of the pain other than what the patient thought or the referring doctor thought the problem was.  The goal is to help the patient with whatever is best for their specific condition. So, one of the things that I do is I determine what their pain source is.

I’m going to use the example of another patient story, which is Susanna B., and she came to me for an ozone disc injection. Now, I had treated her son approximately five years earlier for an ozone disc injection, and he did extremely well with only one treatment. Susanna was in a car accident and she had severe back pain and she tried everything. It didn’t help, and I don’t have her chart in front of me, but I remember most of the details, and she went to two orthopedic spine surgeons, and they both recommended spine surgery. She didn’t want spine surgery, and she came to me specifically for ozone disc injection. I did my due diligence. We talked about the history and the physical exam. I determined that her problem was mostly likely from her hip. I talked about the history, and I talked about it’s very important to ask questions about the pain pattern.

This is a very good example. This is somebody who had low back pain and the pain was going down her leg, and she did have disc issues, but the pain was clearly coming from her hip. Various things just in the history, aside from the fact that I observed the way she walked when she came in because there’s a specific gait that is coming in patient with hip issues, but I asked her my guided questions, and she had a lot of groin pain, which is very typical with hip pain because the ball and socket joint of the hip is in the groin area and the pain didn’t radiate below her knee. It never radiated below her knee. Then when I examined her, my physical exam was most consistent with hip issues, so her hip was never looked at with any X-rays or MRIs.

Also, I just have to take a step back, the mechanism of the injury. She saw the accident coming. It was an accident from behind, and she saw it in her rearview mirror, I believe, and she had her foot on the brake. Now, that creates a lot of shock going up to the hip, so there were many things that cued me into looking at the hip, so we did an X-ray. There was a lot of degeneration. We did an MRI, and she had really, really bad hip issues. To confirm what was the source of her problem, I did a diagnostic block, so I did under fluoroscopic guidance, I injected a very long-acting local anesthetic and a steroid. She had significant temporary improvement, and it came back, so I sent her for a hip replacement, and she did great.

Someone might think, “Well, why not try ozone on the hip?” This is an example of really bad pathology. It wasn’t just degeneration. Like I said, I don’t have her chart in front of me, but there were things going on inside her hip on the MRI that I knew were not going to be solved by ozone. So, this is a good example of somebody that was diagnosed by two other physicians that she needed back surgery, and it turns out that it was her hip, and she did very well, and if she had the back surgery, she would have been very unhappy.

RC: Thank you so much, Dr. Bleiweiss. We know you’re busy, so I just want to thank you for all of your time and your help today.

Dr. Warren Bleiweiss: You’re welcome.

RC: For our listeners across the country, if you are interested in speaking with the doctor, please visit www.alternativedisctherapy.com or call 973-403-3334 to schedule an appointment.

And on behalf of our team, we want to thank you for listening, and we look forward to bringing you more top-quality content from our country’s leading experts.

 

ITunes Channel:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/alternative-methods-to-pain-management-through-oxygen/id1367256045